THE IDENTITY OF THE MAZENODIAN FAMILY: OBLATION AS THE SPIRIT THAT DISTINGUISHES IT FROM OTHER GROUPS

What is the spirit that is specific to our existence? Eugene defines it as being that of oblation.

Our Lord Jesus Christ has left to us the task of continuing the great work of the redemption of mankind…
This spirit of being wholly devoted to the glory of God, the service of the Church and the salvation of souls, is the spirit that is proper to our Congregation, a small one, to be sure, but which will always be powerful as long as she is holy.
Our novices must steep themselves in these thoughts, which must sink deep in them and be often meditated.

Letter to Henri Tempier, 22 August 1817, O.W. VI n. 21

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One Response to THE IDENTITY OF THE MAZENODIAN FAMILY: OBLATION AS THE SPIRIT THAT DISTINGUISHES IT FROM OTHER GROUPS

  1. Eleanor Rabnett, Oblate Associate says:

    I found this today as I was coming into Toronto on the bus – was looking for inspiration for the prayer and reflection for Tuesday morning. This won’t help with Tuesday and must pray for inspiration for that, but oh how it addresses the struggle that has been raging off and on for the past six months. And it also speaks to that question of “who am I?”

    “What is the spirit that is specific to our existence?” Eugene wrote: “…the great work of the redemption of mankind”. Dear God in heaven how does that fit me? I am not a great teacher, or a skilled orator – at best I can share who I am and who you are. I can love and serve in all the little ways there are. Yes I can share that they will know your love – that is our redemption – if we see and experience you then the rest follows. “The spirit of being wholly devoted to the glory of God…” This is oblation, this is giving my all to you. It is how each of us is called, how each of us is sent out to be missionaries, even our small scattered groups of Associates. “Our novices must steep themselves in these thoughts…” until they become an intricate part of who we are, in much the same way as our breathing in and out – not consciously thought out, but simply a part of who we are. It seems at times I know intuitively of the hows and whys, if only I could struggle less with them, let go a little earlier.

    I guess I needed to clear this up before I could look at relating the prayer to my experience of Vatican II in my spiritual life and/or my mission life. I know you shall give me the words Lord, I need only to listen.

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