CERTAIN RIDICULOUS AND OUT-OF-PLACE EXPRESSIONS OF LOVE MUST ALSO BE REMOVED

From our hymnals, certain ridiculous and out-of-place expressions of love must also be removed; verses that are significant and inspiring of piety are what is needed.

Letter to Jean Baptiste Mille, 6 April 1837, EO IX n 611

He repeats this sentiment in his private journal:

I do not approve of a lot of singing without refrains, less still adorations, which are an insipid and wearying form of song at a moment when one would rather pray fervently without being distracted by singing, unless it is singing oneself some couplets of the very moving sort that inspire piety.

Eugene de Mazenod’s Diary, 7 April 1837, EO XVIII

Yvon Beaudoin adds in a note: “We retain a copy of the Recueil de cantiques published in Grenoble in 1837, 152 pages. Among the prayers, placed at the beginning of the volume, is found, on pages XXI-XXIV, a “Hymn during Mass”, composed of 20 verses, one for the moment of the Introit, another at the Confiteor, at the reading of the Epistle, etc. When speaking of ‘adorations’ Bishop de Mazenod is perhaps referring to this hymn.”

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One Response to CERTAIN RIDICULOUS AND OUT-OF-PLACE EXPRESSIONS OF LOVE MUST ALSO BE REMOVED

  1. Eleanor Rabnett, Oblate Associate says:

    What kind of hymn is Eugene speaking of when he writes of “certain ridiculous and out of place expressions of love must also be removed”?

    I idly wonder just what kind of music Eugene would have approved of – would he have approved of some of the hymns that we sing during our liturgies today? Does it truly matter?

    I think of some of the hymns that I love to sing – those ones that enter into my daily life – not only when I am at Mass but which my soul loves to sing; like the “Magnificat”, “Something Which Is Known”, “Song of the Lord’s Command” by Haas and many more. They, along with particular prayers which become a part of my breathing in and breathing out; I am reminded of how I say/pray/sing “Lord have mercy on me” (which translates to ‘Lord – love me’ and forgiveness is embedded within that).

    I think for a moment of my heart’s response to the language of “The Preface” and even of some of the wording in the Rule of Life; some of it very old and very holy. Perhaps Eugene is speaking to us about what has been given by the Spirit versus that which is simply ‘popular’. And perhaps it is simply about the response of our hearts to what he has spoken of today.

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