WAIT WITHOUT COMMOTION AND WITHOUT CARE FOR THE GOOD GOD TO SHOW US HIS PLANS

Eugene had learnt to be patient in regard to rushing into new missionary ventures. The previous year, 1829, he had gone to the Kingdom of Sardinia to see about an Oblate establishment there, but his haste had been futile and nothing had come of it. Now he took the question of sending missionaries to Algeria much more calmly – and relying on longer discernment and prayer.

… On that occasion, I took the resolution never to rush the time of Providence and in the future to allow myself to be led quite gently by it, to let it speak twice, lest I not understand its adorable designs very well.

Letter to Bishop Billiet, 7 June 1830, EO XIII n.74

It was advice he gave to two of the Oblate communities who were pressurizing him to send Oblates to the newly-opened opportunity for evangelization in Algeria.

… I see by the letter of Honorat that they are much too concerned with Algeria. Tell the two houses that that is enough. When the time comes, if indeed it comes, then we shall see. For now, let each mind his business, let each prepare for any eventuality by study and by piety and let them await without commotion and without care for the good God to show us his plans.

Letter to Henri Tempier, 1 August 1830, EO VII n. 351

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3 Responses to WAIT WITHOUT COMMOTION AND WITHOUT CARE FOR THE GOOD GOD TO SHOW US HIS PLANS

  1. Eleanor Rabnett, Oblate Associate says:

    How do I wait? Is it with or without patience? Am I anxious to get the results of what I have asked for? Do I somehow attempt to pressure and prove to another how ‘worthy’ I might be of whatever I am trying to get or do? Am I in a state of upheaval or disconnectedness? I think of the times during the day that I whisper The Lord’s prayer: “…Your kingdom come, Your will be done…”. Whose will am I living and thinking of in my life?

    Do I go about it as Eugene mentions to Henri Tempier in a spirit of living each moment, ‘minding my business’, doing what I must rather than dropping everything else to wait for the news?

    I look at St. Eugene who seemed always to be in motion even when he wasn’t – so profound was the effect that he had on people around him as well as those today who share in his spirit and way of being. I am reminded of the time that he stayed behind as his community went out in procession and he remained in the chapel with Our Lady, resting in prayer. I think of what I have learned about him and how the ‘doing’ comes from the ‘being’.

    So appropriate for me today, to “wait without commotion and care” for God to continue to reveal his plans.

  2. Anda Sprudzs says:

    Today’s post reminded me of two stories. The first deals with how in our prayers we may ask God for things, but we think we do so on God’s time.”God grant me patience, and I want it NOW.”

    The second is a real world example. In Ottawa, Fr Bob Bedard, founder of the Companions of the Cross, was sent to a parish, and tried unsuccessfully to “make” the parish grow. As he would tell the story, Fr Bob prayed and came to understand that God wanted him to stop and let Him do His work. St Mary’s became a vibrant parish.

  3. Maria Cristina Falcon says:

    Sounds like me too, so impatient, always want to be where the action is, st. Eugene pray for us who are anxious, pray for us who need peace, let Gods will be m

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