TELLING THE POPE WHO THE MOST ABANDONED ARE FOR THE OBLATES

We continue to explore the petition Eugene wrote to present to the Pope. In today’s extract he presents a picture of the ten year-old ministry of the Oblates.

They have devoted themselves mainly to the missions, which is the principal aim of their Institute and this preferably in the most abandoned areas, preaching there in the local language, that is in the dialect, the daily language of the people who do not understand French well in these remote places.
They have offered their assistance to the clergy in view of a moral reform by means of retreats and a good priestly training in seminaries.
They have dedicated themselves to the care of the youth whom they gather in Christian groups in order to withdraw them from the world’s corruption.
They have also been engaged in serving poor prisoners whom they instruct, to whom they administer the Sacraments and those who are condemned to death they accompany even to the gallows.

Petition for approbation to Pope Leo XII, 8 December 1825, EO XIII n.48

We must lead men to act like human beings, first of all, and then like Christians, and, finally, we must help them to become saints.
Such are the great works of salvation that can crown the efforts of priests whom God has inspired with the desire to form themselves into a Society in order to work more effectively for the salvation of souls and for their own sanctification. To bring all this into being, they must carry out their duty worthily, faithfully fulfilling their splendid vocation.

Preface of the CC&RR

“The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.”  Luke 4:18-19

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1 Response to TELLING THE POPE WHO THE MOST ABANDONED ARE FOR THE OBLATES

  1. Eleanor Rabnett, Oblate Associate says:

    This morning is but another call to love and rejoice and give thanks. I never fail to find the Preface inspiring, like a small wind on embers that suddenly begin to glow hotter and eventually give birth again to fire. Eugene’s eloquence can be so inviting, it fills me with life that it is impossible to turn away from without first exploring my heart’s response.

    So I have spent this past hour reflecting, exploring how we are all connected with each other in this process of living. This is so much more than just the doing of good deeds. This is the giving and the receiving, realising that my salvation lies in the both, this is how I seek the face of Jesus. It is never just me alone, it is only with the others that I will find salvation and come home. We become responsible for each other’s salvation in a way. It is rather humbling and yet joyous and freeing at the same time.

    Eugene said “We must lead men to act like human beings, first of all, and then like Christians, and, finally, we must help them to become saints.” In doing this, whether it is as priests, religious, or lay persons, it is in each other we find ourselves realising our own humanity, realising the depth of Christ in our being, realising our own call to holiness.

    “To bring all this into being, they must carry out their duty worthily, faithfully fulfilling their splendid vocation.” This then is the story of all of us. I do not remember now where I first heard this but I have copied it down so that it is before me always and have thought of it more than a few times this morning: “My vocation is not only the way I love God, but also the way God loves me.” (Fr. James Martin, SJ)

    O Glorious Salvation

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